Butter Naan (Indian Flatbread made without Tandoor, on Tava)- Step by Step Recipe

Butter Naan (or Naan with a generous drizzle of melted butter), the most delectable of all Indian flatbreads, is one of the most famous dishes of the North Indian cuisine. It is generally made with all purpose flour (maida), which is known to give you an incredibly soft and bubbly texture. This is one dish that is loved by everyone from elders to kids, and is one of the most frequently ordered main course items at restaurants. Falling under the ‘unhealthy but yummy’ category, Butter Naans are the preferred main course delicacy for special occasions.

IMG_20171102_195744

This is a foolproof recipe requiring only basic ingredients from your kitchen. This recipe uses yeast, which is the most commonly used ingredient in making any type of leavened flatbread. You can, however, substitute this with a teaspoon of baking soda if you do not prefer yeast in your recipe.

Butter Naans are best served hot, as they become really stretchy and hard to chew when they cool down. They go brilliantly well with Paneer Butter Masala- a creamy, gravy-style delicacy made with cottage cheese. This time, I served it with Aloo Matar (Potato-Peas) in a rich tomato-onion-cashew gravy.

IMG_20171102_195959

Ingredients

  1. All Purpose Flour/Maida- 1 1/2 cup
  2. Salt- 1 tsp
  3. Sugar- 1tsp
  4. Active Dry Yeast- 1 tsp
  5. Oil- 2 tbsp

Method

Preparing your yeast mixture

  • Add a teaspoon of dry, active yeast to half a cup of lukewarm water.
  • Then, add sugar, dissolve and let it sit for about 10-15 minutes
  • The yeast mixture will become frothy and will start forming a layer on top.

2017-11-032

Making the dough

2017-11-034

  • Take one and a half cups of all purpose flour.
  • To this, add some salt.
  • Pour the proofed yeast mixture and start mixing the dough with your hands.
  • Add some more lukewarm water if required, and 2 tbsp oil. Continue mixing to form a soft dough.
  • Bring the dough to a clean surface. Oil your hands and knead this further to form a really smooth dough. The stickiness should disappear.
  • Put it back in the bowl, cover with a damp muslin cloth. Let it sit aside to ferment for about two hours (or more if you live in a colder climate).

2017-11-033

  • By now, your dough should have doubled in size and become flatter.
  • Punch the dough down to release any air bubbles present and add some oil to remove the dough from the bowl.
  • Then, knead it again for a few seconds and divide them into medium-sized (about 2 inch) balls.
  • Flour the surface and roll each ball as thin as you can with the help of some more dry flour.

Making the Naans

  • Take each rolled naan and place it on a skillet on medium-high flame. (I added some sesame seeds and coriander on top of each of the naans and pressed them with the help of the rolling pin prior to cooking, which is optional).
  • Cook the naan, covered, for a few seconds on each side. You should see little bubbles appearing.
  • Cook until you see brown spots on both sides.
  • Brush with butter on both sides, or drizzle melted butter on top.

2017-11-035

Serve hot with a gravy of your choice! Happy cooking 😀

IMG_20171102_193541

TIPS AND TWEAKS

  • As mentioned earlier, you can substitute yeast with baking soda. This, however, does not need any fermentation time. You can proceed with cooking them directly.
  • Make sure the flame is not too high while baking them, as they would burn on the outside but remain uncooked on the inside. Covering them will ensure they bake evenly in the heat.
  • Naans taste best when served hot. So, reheat them on a tava before servig, if required. you could also half-cook them, freeze them for weeks together and recook them as and when needed.
  • The fermentation process usually takes about two to three hours depending on the climate you live in, but try to keep it in a warm place.
Advertisements